Hit Us With Your Best Shot

Here at DOPE Magazine we’ve been salivating over these macro shots, cultivated from our favorite cannabis photographers on Instagram. Make sure you have some nug nearby before reading—you’re going to need it!

Artist: @alphacanna – Location: Spokane, WA

Artist Bio: Photography is something I’ve always been interested in, but my journey in photography didn’t begin until July of 2014, when I bought my first camera. At that point I had grown Cannabis for nearly 20 years, but never shared the beauty of the plant with anyone besides a couple of close friends. Instagram became a thing around the same time laws started to relax in Washington, so I put my smart phone to work. I knew right away I wasn’t doing this amazing plant justice, and I needed to step up to some real gear. I remember being frustrated with all of the settings for a long time, and felt like going back to the phone camera. But I stuck with it, did lots of reading and eventually left the auto setting, never to look back. Nowadays, grabbing my camera and going downstairs to my little makeshift studio to snap a couple shots is the most relaxing part of my day.

Artist: @dankshire_ – Location: Bremerton, WA

Artist Bio: My name is Sean Moore, and I am the photographer behind @dankshire. I’m based out of Bremerton, WA, just a ferry ride away from Seattle. I started photographing the medical cannabis I picked up from collectives. I would post on Instagram as @dankshire and tag the collectives/growers/extraction labs involved, and eventually the collectives, gardens and labs invited me out to photograph their work.

Artist: @erik.nugshots – Location: San Diego, CA

Artist Bio: When I first started smoking cannabis, I was really fascinated by the different scents, looks, and colors that cannabis strains had. After I saw my first deep purple colored strain (GDP) I set up a little shot on my desk and got some decent shots. One of them ended up going viral on StumbleUpon, but I was frustrated by the lack of depth of field those photos had. Over the years, I’ve experimented with different ways to shoot, different camera setups, light diffusion, etc. Over 1,000 nugs later, I found my personal favorite way to shoot and process flowers. I shoot and process each one the same way. I’m obsessed with consistency and being able to compare strains months or years apart. I’ve since applied that technique to shooting flowers in 360 degrees, and live plants as well. The super macro world is one that is newer to me, I’ve only been exploring trichomes up close and personal for a few years and I’m totally in love. With focus stacking, I combine up to 250 images at different depths into a single picture. It trips me out because I’m able to create an image with so much depth, it’s something that is optically impossible to see with the human eye.

Artist: @shwale – Location: Portland, OR

Artist Bio: Kale Worden is my name, shwale is my nickname. My Dad was a food photographer. I grew up in the studio, and assisted several photographers. Never thought I’d fancy myself a pro, with such big shoes to fill. I got into cannabis photography from the book The Cannabible; I would sneak away with my Dad’s expensive camera to capture photos of the “dank kind” I was smoking back in the day. I think some of my earliest flower photos are from 2003. I worked in Denver’s industry for a couple of years, got into macro photography and haven’t stopped since. I currently reside in Portland, Oregon with plans to open a 420-friendly gallery.

Artist: @c_weeds – Location: Watsonville, CA

Artist Bio: I got into the cannabis industry about 4 years ago, by sheer luck. My girlfriend made me an Instagram, I bought myself an olloclip for my iPhone 5, and took as many videos and pictures as I could of the things I was smoking. Eventually I was inspired enough to get a DSLR camera, and I’ve been taking pictures and videos ever since. Photography and video have allowed me to meet and work with amazing people in the cannabis industry.

Artist:@chewberto420 – Location: Southwest Colorado

Artist Bio: “I am currently based out of Southwest Colorado, I am an organic cannabis grower, hash artisan, writer and photographer. I’ve been involved with cannabis one way or another for 20+ years. Originally from Southern California, I grew up lucky enough to smoke some amazing cannabis in my early years of consumption. After moving to Colorado and smoking the herb around here, I was not getting the flavor and quality that I was used to enjoying. This lack of quality led me to start growing here in Colorado to provide myself with the sticky herb that I was used to getting. Along the way I decided to start photographing my flowers and extracts which seemed to gain a decent presence, that is until I discovered how to extract anthocyanin via “flower rosin.” I made some twax joints with the colorful rosin and shared photographs of them via social media, they blew up and went viral. Gaining wide-spread praise and criticism from across the world. It led me to High Times which is where I was able to write an article explaining why the rosin was purple, as well as a piece on how to make the purple rosin. I’ve since continued to write articles and do reviews for High Times.”

Artist: Professor P of @dynasty_genetics – Location: Oregon

Artist Bio: “My photo style is passion driven from the love of cannabis, with no classes or formal training. I started taking my first photographs of cannabis back in 1997. It began by documenting some of my first breeding projects with disposable camera(s). I remember being fearful of getting caught developing the film, so I’d only take several cannabis photos per roll and the rest of the photos were landscape shots of the Mt. Hood wilderness. This went on for years until I finally acquired a point and shoot digital camera around 2002.  After getting the hang of the digital camera I attempted getting a closer look at the buds by using reverse binocular lens taped together. Yes, it was ghetto but all I could afford at the time. In 2005 I bought my first DLSR which was the Nikon D200 and at the same time I purchased my first macro lens (105mm Nikkor). After about ten years of shooting with Nikon I switched to Canon mainly for the capabilities of their MP-E 65mm lens which delivers a 5:1 reproduction ratio. All of my macro stacks are taken with a manual rail and no automation. I have an automated rail but it can’t come close to the quality when I do the work myself.”

 

Close