Moto Perpetuo Farm: Where Sustainability Is Key

Rundown

  • Instagram: @motoperpetuofarm
  • Website: motoperpetuofarm.com

Oregon’s Moto Perpetuo Farm prides itself in organic farming, not only of cannabis but of produce. “We operate two locations, in Willamette Valley and in Southern Oregon, mostly due to the subtle climates,” notes David Hoyle, who operates the Willamette Valley facility.

Hoyle says that Moto Perpetuo has a simple philosophy: operating a sustainable, organic farm that’s part of the community. Since 2000, the farm has been supplying organic vegetables, fruits and herbs to local farmers markets and restaurants, but in 2016 the farm became state-licensed and began planting cannabis. “For us, sustainability and reducing waste are important, not only as farmers, but as people,” Hoyle remarks. “We take care of our families, and our employees and their families, and we take care of our farm because it’s our home; it’s our world here.”

Moto Perpetuo Farm: Where Sustainability Is Key

Moto Perpetuo’s practices include planting crops using native soil. “We only plant in ground soil, which we amend with minerals and organic nutrients,” Hoyle describes. “Of course, we harness the power and energy of the sun, so we don’t have massive electricity use like traditional indoor grows.” Hoyle also says that the farm supplements their hogs’ diets with trimmed cannabis leaves: “This is a closed-loop model to reduce our waste. Plus, the diet of the pig can affect the flavor of the fat and meat, from acorns to hazelnuts, so we decided to try it.”

“For us, sustainability and reducing waste are important, not only as farmers, but as people …” – David Hoyle, Moto Perpetuo Farm operator

The use of cannabis leaves to feed hogs was featured in a now-viral culinary video on Eater, a social media foodie site, which showed chefs butchering and tasting cannabis-fed pork.

Moto Perpetuo Farm: Where Sustainability Is Key

When it comes to the numbers, Hoyle said they have around 100 strain varieties and phenotypes of cannabis, ranging from hybrids, indicas and sativas. “We do two to three harvests per year at our Northern farm — each one is 3,000 plants. Smaller plants, faster cycles. But at our Southern farm, it’s bigger, full-season plants, 12 feet tall by 12 feet wide.”

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